Mali t720 linux driver

Mali GPU User-Space Binary Drivers

Mali GPU User-Space Binary Drivers

These packages contain the binary user-space components for GNU/Linux and Android to use on development platforms enabled with the Arm Mali GPU family. These drivers can be used along with the Mali Open Source Kernel Space Device Drivers to create a complete driver stack and run applications using standard APIs such as;

  • OpenGL ES 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, 3.1, 3.2
  • OpenCL 1.1, 1.2, 2.0
  • Vulkan 1.0
  • RenderScript (list of supported APIs varies with the binary and GPU types)

They all include an End User Licence Agreement (EULA) document which defines how these drivers can be used. A new and more permissive version was introduced in January 2016 and all Midgard user-space drivers starting with r6p0 are now distributed under the new terms. The main changes are to allow redistribution of the binaries under the same EULA, commercial use and benchmarking. Read the END_USER_LICENCE_AGREEMENT.txt document included in the packages for the exact licensing terms.

Odroid-N2+ Specifications

Odroid-N2+ is a single board computer created by Hardkernel that is more powerful, more stable, and faster performing than the previous N2 Model.

SoC: The main CPU is based on big.Little architecture which integrates a quad-core ARM Cortex-A73 CPU cluster and a dual core Cortex-A53 cluster with a new generation Mali-G52 GPU.

Architecture: Armv8

OS: Debian Bullseye or Android 12

More information about Odroid-N2+ can be found here

Источник

Mali Open Source Driver

The Mali series is a GPU (Graphics Processor Unit) from ARM Ltd. (ARM Holdings plc), designed for embedded systems.

Contents

Overview

Two open source drivers based on reverse engineering efforts exist for the Mali GPUs.

  • Lima covers the Utgard family (Mali-400/450) used on most Allwinner SoCs that have Mali GPUs.
  • Panfrost covers Midgard (Mali-T[678]xx) (Mali-T720 used on the H6), and Bifrost (Mali-G[357]x) (not implemented by Allwinner).

These include both kernel drivers and userspace drivers in Mesa.

As of 2019/04/12, both drivers have had their userspace components merged into upstream Mesa.

Lima’s kernel driver has been merged, and will be in Linux kernel v5.2, while Panfrost’s kernel driver has gone through multiple review cycles, and is likely to be merged soon.

Kernel drivers

The lima driver is enabled by the kernel config option DRM_LIMA. The panfrost driver is enabled by the kernel config option DRM_PANFROST.

Enable the desired options and follow the mainline kernel build procedures.

Userspace drivers

The userspace drivers are part of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library.

Mesa’s website has a guide on howto build and install the library: [1]. Following it will build in support for mostly everything.

The following are some steps using meson to build a reduced version just for Mali support.

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Dependencies

Mesa has a lot of build time dependencies. For the reduced version we are building, install the following packages (on Debian):

Configuration and Build

Cross Compiling

While the Mesa library isn’t very large, compiling natively on ARM / ARM64 is quite slow.

Build dependencies for cross-compiling

Install the following packages (on Debian).

Meson cross compile settings for armv7hf

Put the following in some file. This will be used by meson.

Configuration

Follow the same steps as the native build, but add the following to the meson command.

Wayland support

If you want to build wayland support as well, add wayland to the list of platforms in the configuration command.

You will need to install the following dependency packages.

For cross-compiling, you will need to install both the native and target versions of libwayland-dev.

Источник

Mali GPU User-Space Binary Drivers

Mali GPU User-Space Binary Drivers

These packages contain the binary user-space components for GNU/Linux and Android to use on development platforms enabled with the Arm Mali GPU family. These drivers can be used along with the Mali Open Source Kernel Space Device Drivers to create a complete driver stack and run applications using standard APIs such as;

  • OpenGL ES 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, 3.1, 3.2
  • OpenCL 1.1, 1.2, 2.0
  • Vulkan 1.0
  • RenderScript (list of supported APIs varies with the binary and GPU types)

They all include an End User Licence Agreement (EULA) document which defines how these drivers can be used. A new and more permissive version was introduced in January 2016 and all Midgard user-space drivers starting with r6p0 are now distributed under the new terms. The main changes are to allow redistribution of the binaries under the same EULA, commercial use and benchmarking. Read the END_USER_LICENCE_AGREEMENT.txt document included in the packages for the exact licensing terms.

Odroid-N2+ Specifications

Odroid-N2+ is a single board computer created by Hardkernel that is more powerful, more stable, and faster performing than the previous N2 Model.

SoC: The main CPU is based on big.Little architecture which integrates a quad-core ARM Cortex-A73 CPU cluster and a dual core Cortex-A53 cluster with a new generation Mali-G52 GPU.

Architecture: Armv8

OS: Debian Bullseye or Android 12

More information about Odroid-N2+ can be found here

Источник

Overview

The Mali series of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are semiconductor intellectual property cores produced by ARM Holdings for licensing in various ASIC (Application-specific integrated circuit) designs by ARM partners. The core is mainly developed by ARM Norway, at the former Falanx company site.

Like other embedded IP cores for 3D support, the Mali GPU does not feature display controllers driving monitors (such as the combination often found in common video cards). Instead it is a pure 3D engine that renders graphics into memory and hands the rendered image over to another core that handles the display.

ARM supplies tools to help in authoring OpenGL ES shaders named Mali GPU Shader Development Studio and Mali GPU User Interface Engine.

All Mali4XX GPU Variants conform to OpenGL ES 1.1 & 2.0 as well as OpenVG 1.1.
All Mali-TXXX GPU Variants conform to OpenGL ES up to 3.1 as well as OpenVG 1.1.
All Mali-GXX GPU Variants conform to OpenGL ES up to 3.2 as well as OpenVG 1.1 and Vulkan 1.2 (no free Vulkan driver yet).

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Variants:

There are several generations of which two are currently used by Allwinner.

Utgard

Name GP (Geometry Processor)
/ vertex shader
PP (Pixel Processor)
/ fragment shader
CPU Level 2 cache size Allwinner implementations
Mali-400 MP 1 1 256 KiB A10 (sun4i), A10s (sun5i), and A13 (sun5i)
Mali-400 MP2 1 2 256/512 KiB A20 (sun7i), A23 (sun8i), A33, H3, R40 (sun8i), A64 (sun50i)
Mali-450 MP4 1 4 512 KiB H5 (sun50i)

Midgard

Name unified shader cores CPU Level 2 cache size Allwinner implementations
Mali-T720 MP2 2 512 KiB H6 (sun50i)
Mali-T760 MP2 2 512 KiB A63 (sun50i)

Bifrost

Name unified shader cores CPU Level 2 cache size Allwinner implementations
Mali-G31 MP2 2 . KiB H616, H313 (sun50i)

More information can be found on the ARM website.

Driver

Utgard (Mali-400 and Mali-450)

Lima driver (Open Source)

Lima is a project to develop a completely open source graphics driver which supports ARM’s Mali-400 and Mali-450 GPUs.

It consists of two main parts:

  • Kernel parts have been included in mainline kernel since v5.2
  • Mesa (userspace) parts have been part of upstream project since April 2019.

Binary driver

  • Mainline Linux: Maxime Ripard (Bootlin) worked on Mali OpenGL support with mainline Linux, please refer these instructions
  • Legacy Kernel (Outdated): For information on the binary driver, please refer to the binary driver installation guide.

Midgard (Mali T6xx, T7xx, T8xx) and Bifrost (G3x, G5x, G6x, G7x)

Panfrost driver (Open Source)

Panfrost is a project to develop a completely open source graphics driver which supports ARM’s Mali-T6xx, Mali-T7xx, Mali-T800 and Mali-G7x GPUs. This is a work in progress and not yet ready for general use.
Panfrost results from a merge of 2 driver reverse engineering projects: chai — for Midgard GPUs (by Alyssa Rosenzweig) and BiOpenly — for Bifrost GPUs (by Lyude Paul). The merge was done due to identical command streams of the ARM Midgard and Bifrost GPUs (but different shader cores).

The aim of this drivers and others such as freedreno is to finally bring all the advantages of open source software to ARM SoC graphics drivers. Currently, the sole availability of binary drivers is increasing development and maintenance overhead, while also reducing portability, compatibility and limiting choice. Anyone who has dealt with GPU support on ARM, be it for a linux with a GNU stack, or for an android, knows the pain of dealing with these binaries.

Источник

  • MaliGraphics

ARM produce designs for a GPU called «Mali». This is incorporated in many SoCs and thus devices. It is used in a number of devices that can run Debian.

There are four major revisions of Mali GPUs: Utgard, Midgard, Bifrost, and Valhall. See the Wikipedia page for reference.

On Debian 11 and newer, you’re required to use the free and open-source Panfrost/Lima drivers included in Mesa instead of the proprietary drivers documented in this article. More information can be found in the PanfrostLima article.

Proprietary drivers are available from the vendor for each Mali version. Since 2016, the binary drivers put out by ARM have been redistributable and thus can be packaged for non-free. GPLed kernel shim drivers are also released by ARM, which is eligible for Debian contrib. As of March 2017, these have been packaged in Debian for Midgard devices; see MaliMidgard. Upstream proprietary drivers are available from The ARM developer site

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In practice, relevant hardware is

    Mali-400 (Allwinner A20/A64 boards)

Mali-450 (Utgard; HiKey)

  • Mali-T6x0 (Midgard; Juno, Firefly, Chromebook, Odroid XU3)
  • Mali-T7x0 (Midgard; Firefly, Tinkerboard, Chromebook)
  • Mali-T8x0 (Midgard; Firefly 2, Chromebook, Pinebook Pro)
  • Mali-G71 (Bifrost; Hikey960)
  • Installation

    With Debian 10/Buster, the proprietary drivers are packaged in the non-free section of the repos and can be installed through Apt for armhf/32-bit ARM systems. Debian’s packages for the proprietary driver were removed in Debian 11/Bullseye, due to the free driver being included in Mesa.

    You’ll need to first install the proper kernel headers. With the default Debian kernel, you can install the linux-headers-armmp package.

    Then you can install the driver package for your GPU flavour and windowing system, i.e. one of:

    Or, for t62x hardware:

    Note that not every combination of GPU and windowing system is available, because we can only package what ARM release.

    Kernel drivers

    There is a different kernel driver for each major hardware revision, and thus a different debian dkms package:

      Mali 4xx: ‘utgard’ mali-utgard-dkms

    Mali Txxx: ‘midgard’ mali-midgard-dkms

  • Mali Gxx: ‘bifrost’ mali-bifrost-dkms
  • Due to significant similarities between Midgard and Bifrost (sharing significant parts of their command stream), the Midgard and Bifrost drivers are currently identical (mid 2018). Confusingly the identical midgard and bifrost kernel drivers are released separately on ARM’s developer site with different package version numbers (so midgard r25p0 is the same code/driver as bifrost r13p0).

    Because the packaging uses dkms, the driver should be automatically rebuilt for your kernel and copied into initrds, and updated when you install new kernels.

    ARM’s versioning scheme is of the form r16p0 (release 16, patch-level0). This is translated into debian versioning as ‘16.0’ (dkms versions cannot start with a letter).

    Blob userspace drivers

    Each binary driver is built for a specific combination of OS (linux/Android), hardware platform, GPU generation (4×0/T6x0/T7x0), and graphics technology (fbdev/X/wayland/surfaceflinger). Platforms are sometimes dropped, so you might need to choose an older version to get a driver that will work on older hardware. A few plaftforms have DTB support, so one driver build can work on more than one bit of actual hardware. This makes for painful distro packaging.

    A binary driver should work with a kernel driver released at the same time, and up to 4 earlier versions. The binary driver does an API version check on the kernel driver on start-up.

    ARM dropped support for X in their releases after r16 (Jan 2017). This is a massive pain as that’s what we all still use. Only wayland, fbdev and android are supported after that.

    The binary drivers do not yet use the vendor-egl dispatch mechanism that lets you install more than one vendor-supplied libEGL, described at: https://github.com/aritger/linux-opengl-abi-proposal/blob/master/linux-opengl-abi-proposal.txt, so if you install any mali binary driver mesa, or any other EGL driver will be removed. Ideally more than one should be installable because you may have more than one GPU available.

    Packaging Status

    mali-midgard (kernel driver) is in Buster.

    Currently these are all r16 as that supports the widest range of binary drivers, including X. We cannot move forward from r16 without dropping X support and that’s not very attractive.

    Источник

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