Visual studio код для linux

Visual Studio Code on Linux

Installation

See the Download Visual Studio Code page for a complete list of available installation options.

By downloading and using Visual Studio Code, you agree to the license terms and privacy statement.

Debian and Ubuntu based distributions

The easiest way to install Visual Studio Code for Debian/Ubuntu based distributions is to download and install the .deb package (64-bit), either through the graphical software center if it’s available, or through the command line with:

Note that other binaries are also available on the VS Code download page.

Installing the .deb package will automatically install the apt repository and signing key to enable auto-updating using the system’s package manager. Alternatively, the repository and key can also be installed manually with the following script:

Then update the package cache and install the package using:

RHEL, Fedora, and CentOS based distributions

We currently ship the stable 64-bit VS Code in a yum repository, the following script will install the key and repository:

Then update the package cache and install the package using dnf (Fedora 22 and above):

Or on older versions using yum :

Due to the manual signing process and the system we use to publish, the yum repo may lag behind and not get the latest version of VS Code immediately.

Visual Studio Code is officially distributed as a Snap package in the Snap Store:

You can install it by running:

Once installed, the Snap daemon will take care of automatically updating VS Code in the background. You will get an in-product update notification whenever a new update is available.

Note: If snap isn’t available in your Linux distribution, please check the following Installing snapd guide, which can help you get that set up.

Learn more about snaps from the official Snap Documentation.

openSUSE and SLE-based distributions

The yum repository above also works for openSUSE and SLE-based systems, the following script will install the key and repository:

Then update the package cache and install the package using:

AUR package for Arch Linux

To get more information about the installation from the AUR, please consult the following wiki entry: Install AUR Packages.

Nix package for NixOS (or any Linux distribution using Nix package manager)

There is a community maintained VS Code Nix package in the nixpkgs repository. In order to install it using Nix, set allowUnfree option to true in your config.nix and execute:

Installing .rpm package manually

The VS Code .rpm package (64-bit) can also be manually downloaded and installed, however, auto-updating won’t work unless the repository above is installed. Once downloaded it can be installed using your package manager, for example with dnf :

Note that other binaries are also available on the VS Code download page.

Updates

VS Code ships monthly and you can see when a new release is available by checking the release notes. If the VS Code repository was installed correctly, then your system package manager should handle auto-updating in the same way as other packages on the system.

Note: Updates are automatic and run in the background for the Snap package.

Node.js

Node.js is a popular platform and runtime for easily building and running JavaScript applications. It also includes npm, a Package Manager for Node.js modules. You’ll see Node.js and npm mentioned frequently in our documentation and some optional VS Code tooling requires Node.js (for example, the VS Code extension generator).

If you’d like to install Node.js on Linux, see Installing Node.js via package manager to find the Node.js package and installation instructions tailored to your Linux distribution. You can also install and support multiple versions of Node.js by using the Node Version Manager.

To learn more about JavaScript and Node.js, see our Node.js tutorial, where you’ll learn about running and debugging Node.js applications with VS Code.

Setting VS Code as the default text editor

xdg-open

You can set the default text editor for text files ( text/plain ) that is used by xdg-open with the following command:

Debian alternatives system

Debian-based distributions allow setting a default editor using the Debian alternatives system, without concern for the MIME type. You can set this by running the following and selecting code:

If Visual Studio Code doesn’t show up as an alternative to editor , you need to register it:

Windows as a Linux developer machine

Another option for Linux development with VS Code is to use a Windows machine with the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL).

Windows Subsystem for Linux

With WSL, you can install and run Linux distributions on Windows. This enables you to develop and test your source code on Linux while still working locally on a Windows machine. WSL supports Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, SUSE, and Alpine available from the Microsoft Store.

When coupled with the WSL extension, you get full VS Code editing and debugging support while running in the context of a Linux distro on WSL.

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See the Developing in WSL documentation to learn more or try the Working in WSL introductory tutorial.

Next steps

Once you have installed VS Code, these topics will help you learn more about it:

  • Additional Components — Learn how to install Git, Node.js, TypeScript, and tools like Yeoman.
  • User Interface — A quick orientation to VS Code.
  • User/Workspace Settings — Learn how to configure VS Code to your preferences through settings.

Common questions

Azure VM Issues

I’m getting a «Running without the SUID sandbox» error?

You can safely ignore this error.

Debian and moving files to trash

If you see an error when deleting files from the VS Code Explorer on the Debian operating system, it might be because the trash implementation that VS Code is using is not there.

Run these commands to solve this issue:

Conflicts with VS Code packages from other repositories

Some distributions, for example Pop!_OS provide their own code package. To ensure the official VS Code repository is used, create a file named /etc/apt/preferences.d/code with the following content:

«Visual Studio Code is unable to watch for file changes in this large workspace» (error ENOSPC)

When you see this notification, it indicates that the VS Code file watcher is running out of handles because the workspace is large and contains many files. Before adjusting platform limits, make sure that potentially large folders, such as Python .venv , are added to the files.watcherExclude setting (more details below). The current limit can be viewed by running:

The limit can be increased to its maximum by editing /etc/sysctl.conf (except on Arch Linux, read below) and adding this line to the end of the file:

The new value can then be loaded in by running sudo sysctl -p .

While 524,288 is the maximum number of files that can be watched, if you’re in an environment that is particularly memory constrained, you may want to lower the number. Each file watch takes up 1080 bytes, so assuming that all 524,288 watches are consumed, that results in an upper bound of around 540 MiB.

Arch-based distros (including Manjaro) require you to change a different file; follow these steps instead.

Another option is to exclude specific workspace directories from the VS Code file watcher with the files.watcherExclude setting. The default for files.watcherExclude excludes node_modules and some folders under .git , but you can add other directories that you don’t want VS Code to track.

I can’t see Chinese characters in Ubuntu

We’re working on a fix. In the meantime, open the application menu, then choose File > Preferences > Settings. In the Text Editor > Font section, set «Font Family» to Droid Sans Mono, Droid Sans Fallback . If you’d rather edit the settings.json file directly, set editor.fontFamily as shown:

Package git is not installed

This error can appear during installation and is typically caused by the package manager’s lists being out of date. Try updating them and installing again:

The code bin command does not bring the window to the foreground on Ubuntu

Running code . on Ubuntu when VS Code is already open in the current directory will not bring VS Code into the foreground. This is a feature of the OS which can be disabled using ccsm .

Under General > General Options > Focus & Raise Behaviour, set «Focus Prevention Level» to «Off». Remember this is an OS-level setting that will apply to all applications, not just VS Code.

Cannot install .deb package due to «/etc/apt/sources.list.d/vscode.list: No such file or directory»

This can happen when sources.list.d doesn’t exist or you don’t have access to create the file. To fix this, try manually creating the folder and an empty vscode.list file:

Cannot move or resize the window while X forwarding a remote window

If you are using X forwarding to use VS Code remotely, you will need to use the native title bar to ensure you can properly manipulate the window. You can switch to using it by setting window.titleBarStyle to native .

Using the custom title bar

The custom title bar and menus were enabled by default on Linux for several months. The custom title bar has been a success on Windows, but the customer response on Linux suggests otherwise. Based on feedback, we have decided to make this setting opt-in on Linux and leave the native title bar as the default.

The custom title bar provides many benefits including great theming support and better accessibility through keyboard navigation and screen readers. Unfortunately, these benefits do not translate as well to the Linux platform. Linux has a variety of desktop environments and window managers that can make the VS Code theming look foreign to users. For users needing the accessibility improvements, we recommend enabling the custom title bar when running in accessibility mode using a screen reader. You can still manually set the title bar with the Window: Title Bar Style ( window.titleBarStyle ) setting.

Broken cursor in editor with display scaling enabled

Due to an upstream issue #14787 with Electron, the mouse cursor may render incorrectly with scaling enabled. If you notice that the usual text cursor is not being rendered inside the editor as you would expect, try falling back to the native menu bar by configuring the setting window.titleBarStyle to native .

Repository changed its origin value

If you receive an error similar to the following:

Use apt instead of apt-get and you will be prompted to accept the origin change:

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Using C++ on Linux in VS Code

In this tutorial, you will configure Visual Studio Code to use the GCC C++ compiler (g++) and GDB debugger on Linux. GCC stands for GNU Compiler Collection; GDB is the GNU debugger.

After configuring VS Code, you will compile and debug a simple C++ program in VS Code. This tutorial does not teach you GCC, GDB, Ubuntu or the C++ language. For those subjects, there are many good resources available on the Web.

If you have trouble, feel free to file an issue for this tutorial in the VS Code documentation repository.

Prerequisites

To successfully complete this tutorial, you must do the following:

Install the C++ extension for VS Code. You can install the C/C++ extension by searching for ‘c++’ in the Extensions view ( ⇧⌘X (Windows, Linux Ctrl+Shift+X ) ).

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Ensure GCC is installed

Although you’ll use VS Code to edit your source code, you’ll compile the source code on Linux using the g++ compiler. You’ll also use GDB to debug. These tools are not installed by default on Ubuntu, so you have to install them. Fortunately, that’s easy.

First, check to see whether GCC is already installed. To verify whether it is, open a Terminal window and enter the following command:

If GCC isn’t installed, run the following command from the terminal window to update the Ubuntu package lists. An out-of-date Linux distribution can sometimes interfere with attempts to install new packages.

Next install the GNU compiler tools and the GDB debugger with this command:

Create Hello World

From the terminal window, create an empty folder called projects to store your VS Code projects. Then create a subfolder called helloworld , navigate into it, and open VS Code in that folder by entering the following commands:

The code . command opens VS Code in the current working folder, which becomes your «workspace». As you go through the tutorial, you will create three files in a .vscode folder in the workspace:

  • tasks.json (compiler build settings)
  • launch.json (debugger settings)
  • c_cpp_properties.json (compiler path and IntelliSense settings)

Add hello world source code file

In the File Explorer title bar, select New File and name the file helloworld.cpp .

Paste in the following source code:

Now press ⌘S (Windows, Linux Ctrl+S ) to save the file. Notice that your files are listed in the File Explorer view ( ⇧⌘E (Windows, Linux Ctrl+Shift+E ) ) in the side bar of VS Code:

You can also enable Auto Save to automatically save your file changes, by checking Auto Save in the main File menu.

The Activity Bar on the edge of Visual Studio Code lets you open different views such as Search, Source Control, and Run. You’ll look at the Run view later in this tutorial. You can find out more about the other views in the VS Code User Interface documentation.

Note: When you save or open a C++ file, you may see a notification from the C/C++ extension about the availability of an Insiders version, which lets you test new features and fixes. You can ignore this notification by selecting the X (Clear Notification).

Explore IntelliSense

In the helloworld.cpp file, hover over vector or string to see type information. After the declaration of the msg variable, start typing msg. as you would when calling a member function. You should immediately see a completion list that shows all the member functions, and a window that shows the type information for the msg object:

You can press the Tab key to insert the selected member. Then, when you add the opening parenthesis, you’ll see information about arguments that the function requires.

Run helloworld.cpp

Remember, the C++ extension uses the C++ compiler you have installed on your machine to build your program. Make sure you have a C++ compiler installed before attempting to run and debug helloworld.cpp in VS Code.

Open helloworld.cpp so that it is the active file.

Press the play button in the top right corner of the editor.

Choose g++ build and debug active file from the list of detected compilers on your system.

You’ll only be asked to choose a compiler the first time you run helloworld.cpp . This compiler will be set as the «default» compiler in tasks.json file.

After the build succeeds, your program’s output will appear in the integrated Terminal.

The first time you run your program, the C++ extension creates tasks.json , which you’ll find in your project’s .vscode folder. tasks.json stores build configurations.

Your new tasks.json file should look similar to the JSON below:

Note: You can learn more about tasks.json variables in the variables reference.

The command setting specifies the program to run; in this case that is g++. The args array specifies the command-line arguments that will be passed to g++. These arguments must be specified in the order expected by the compiler.

This task tells g++ to take the active file ( $ ), compile it, and create an executable file in the current directory ( $ ) with the same name as the active file but without an extension ( $ ), resulting in helloworld for our example.

The label value is what you will see in the tasks list; you can name this whatever you like.

The detail value is what you will as the description of the task in the tasks list. It’s highly recommended to rename this value to differentiate it from similar tasks.

From now on, the play button will read from tasks.json to figure out how to build and run your program. You can define multiple build tasks in tasks.json , and whichever task is marked as the default will be used by the play button. In case you need to change the default compiler, you can run Tasks: Configure default build task. Alternatively you can modify the tasks.json file and remove the default by replacing this segment:

Modifying tasks.json

You can modify your tasks.json to build multiple C++ files by using an argument like «$/*.cpp» instead of $ .This will build all .cpp files in your current folder. You can also modify the output filename by replacing «$/$» with a hard-coded filename (for example ‘helloworld.out’).

Debug helloworld.cpp

  1. Go back to helloworld.cpp so that it is the active file.
  2. Set a breakpoint by clicking on the editor margin or using F9 on the current line.
  3. From the drop-down next to the play button, select Debug C/C++ File.
  4. Choose C/C++: g++ build and debug active file from the list of detected compilers on your system (you’ll only be asked to choose a compiler the first time you run/debug helloworld.cpp ).

The play button has two modes: Run C/C++ File and Debug C/C++ File. It will default to the last-used mode. If you see the debug icon in the play button, you can just click the play button to debug, instead of selecting the drop-down menu item.

Explore the debugger

Before you start stepping through the code, let’s take a moment to notice several changes in the user interface:

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The Integrated Terminal appears at the bottom of the source code editor. In the Debug Output tab, you see output that indicates the debugger is up and running.

The editor highlights line 12, which is a breakpoint that you set before starting the debugger:

The Run and Debug view on the left shows debugging information. You’ll see an example later in the tutorial.

At the top of the code editor, a debugging control panel appears. You can move this around the screen by grabbing the dots on the left side.

If you already have a launch.json file in your workspace, the play button will read from it when figuring out how run and debug your C++ file. If you don’t have launch.json, the play button will create a temporary “quick debug” configuration on the fly, eliminating the need for launch.json altogether!

Step through the code

Now you’re ready to start stepping through the code.

Click or press the Step over icon in the debugging control panel.

This will advance program execution to the first line of the for loop, and skip over all the internal function calls within the vector and string classes that are invoked when the msg variable is created and initialized. Notice the change in the Variables window on the side.

Press Step over again to advance to the next statement in this program (skipping over all the internal code that is executed to initialize the loop). Now, the Variables window shows information about the loop variables.

Press Step over again to execute the cout statement. (Note that as of the March 2019 release, the C++ extension does not print any output to the Debug Console until the last cout executes.)

If you like, you can keep pressing Step over until all the words in the vector have been printed to the console. But if you are curious, try pressing the Step Into button to step through source code in the C++ standard library!

To return to your own code, one way is to keep pressing Step over. Another way is to set a breakpoint in your code by switching to the helloworld.cpp tab in the code editor, putting the insertion point somewhere on the cout statement inside the loop, and pressing F9 . A red dot appears in the gutter on the left to indicate that a breakpoint has been set on this line.

Then press F5 to start execution from the current line in the standard library header. Execution will break on cout . If you like, you can press F9 again to toggle off the breakpoint.

When the loop has completed, you can see the output in the Debug Console tab of the integrated terminal, along with some other diagnostic information that is output by GDB.

Set a watch

To keep track of the value of a variable as your program executes, set a watch on the variable.

Place the insertion point inside the loop. In the Watch window, click the plus sign and in the text box, type word , which is the name of the loop variable. Now view the Watch window as you step through the loop.

To quickly view the value of any variable while execution is paused on a breakpoint, you can hover over it with the mouse pointer.

Next, you’ll create a tasks.json file to tell VS Code how to build (compile) the program. This task will invoke the g++ compiler to create an executable file from the source code.

It’s important to have helloworld.cpp open in the editor because the next step uses the active file in the editor for context to create the build task in the next step.

Customize debugging with launch.json

When you debug with the play button or F5 , the C++ extension creates a dynamic debug configuration on the fly.

There are cases where you’d want to customize your debug configuration, such as specifying arguments to pass to the program at runtime. You can define custom debug configurations in a launch.json file.

To create launch.json , choose Add Debug Configuration from the play button drop-down menu.

You’ll then see a dropdown for various predefined debugging configurations. Choose g++ build and debug active file.

VS Code creates a launch.json file, which looks something like this:

In the JSON above, program specifies the program you want to debug. Here it is set to the active file folder $ and active filename without an extension $ , which if helloworld.cpp is the active file will be helloworld . The args property is an array of arguments to pass to the program at runtime.

By default, the C++ extension won’t add any breakpoints to your source code and the stopAtEntry value is set to false .

Change the stopAtEntry value to true to cause the debugger to stop on the main method when you start debugging.

From now on, the play button and F5 will read from your launch.json file when launching your program for debugging.

C/C++ configurations

If you want more control over the C/C++ extension, you can create a c_cpp_properties.json file, which will allow you to change settings such as the path to the compiler, include paths, C++ standard (default is C++17), and more.

You can view the C/C++ configuration UI by running the command C/C++: Edit Configurations (UI) from the Command Palette ( ⇧⌘P (Windows, Linux Ctrl+Shift+P ) ).

This opens the C/C++ Configurations page. When you make changes here, VS Code writes them to a file called c_cpp_properties.json in the .vscode folder.

You only need to modify the Include path setting if your program includes header files that are not in your workspace or in the standard library path.

Visual Studio Code places these settings in .vscode/c_cpp_properties.json . If you open that file directly, it should look something like this:

Reusing your C++ configuration

VS Code is now configured to use gcc on Linux. The configuration applies to the current workspace. To reuse the configuration, just copy the JSON files to a .vscode folder in a new project folder (workspace) and change the names of the source file(s) and executable as needed.

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